Tag: Heating and Air Conditioning Products

Technical Corner: Indoor Environment Connections

Recently I was asked to write an article about HVAC System Hygiene for the March issue of Indoor Environment Connections. In this article I discussed four specific, and frustrating situations I have come across during my 25+ years in the industry. These include outsourcing by a major Southeast resort, coil cleaning at a hotel, inspecting an air handler serving a pediatric ward, and ignoring obvious problems at a separate major hospital. To read these field cases, please visit or download http://www.ieconnections.com/pdfs/newsletter/2012/IEC-03-2012.pdf and scroll to page 24.

As always, I welcome your comments below.

Lynn Burkhart is the founder and president of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc. located in Shelby, North Carolina. More information about the company, and its products, can be found at http://www.cleanac.com and by calling (800) 766-9057.


Technical Corner: Handling The Unknowable

It is well understood that air handlers are essentially an enclosure for heat transfer coils and system fans and filters.  It is also a fact that removing and replacement of these units is expensive – quite expensive.

Often, owners wisely elect to refurbish the AHU instead of replacing the unit.  This saves major dollars in almost all cases.  It is almost surprising to see a corroded AHU almost literally falling apart be turned into a usable piece of equipment with a considerable renewed life span, often greater than 15 years.

While the owner might do the refurbishment himself, he may also elect to have an outside contractor perform the refurbishment if he has no staff or limited maintenance support staff available.

Older units gradually lose their galvanizing (the zinc coating over the sheet steel), particular in those areas where there is a lot of water – like the condensate water collection pan, and the coil structural supports.   When corrosion occurs in these places, metal thins of course, and small perforations occur through the metal.  These holes are normally small, the size of pinheads.

They are exceeding difficult to see, if they can be seen at all, when the water is drained from the condensate pans.  This is because the pans sit on concrete and there is no backlight to see these small holes are there.  Larger ones yes, but the smaller ones no.

Because Pancrete was engineered to a water-like consistency to help it flow all over the pan surfaces and under the coils, it will also, like water, tend to seep out through pinholes.  Thus, one can  pour in Pancrete and have it slowly drain out of the pinholes, depending upon the size of the pinhole and the number of them.

Service technicians can hardly be blamed for not seeing the pinholes in the first place – they may be very small and unnoticeable, or the crew  may be working in the middle of the night to do the refurbishment, be in a hurry to finish and not notice them.

A significant method to solve these possible problems is to use the Panhole Filler.  It is designed to be an underlayment for Pancrete that Pancrete will seamlessly adhere to.   The new Panhole Filler will fill holes up to 50 mils in diameter so as to prevent Pancrete from running out of these small, unseen pinholes in the metal.

The Filler is rolled onto the horizontal surfaces first, let to set up, and then Pancrete is poured as usual.  Use of the Filler prevents any surprises so the job goes A to B.   Outside of wasting Pancrete that has leaked through, it invariably is an embarrassment to the refurbishing staff.

Call CRT customer service to learn more about how the new Panhole Filler can help you compete jobs faster with no surprises.

Lynn Burkhart is the founder and president of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc. located in Shelby, North Carolina. More information about the company, and its products, can be found at http://www.cleanac.com and by calling (800) 766-9057.

Technical Corner: Flex Seal vs “Flex Seal”

Over the past two months we have seen an increase in calls to our offices regarding purchasing a new  product called “Flex Seal”, a product sold in a TV informational.   This relatively new  product is in an aerosol can, and is promoted as a sort of “stop-leak” spray for a variety of applications.

In contrast, our company (CRT) created and developed our product Flex Seal in the 1990s.  Ours is a professional product developed to coat walls, wood, and porous materials such as insulation.  The purpose of  CRT’s Flex Seal is to a) contain and encapsulate fiberglass and similar type particles thought by many to be carcinogens, b) to meet National Fire Protection (NFPA) fire and smoke generation code standards,  c) to provide a very low volatile organic (VOC) contribution, and d) to contain an agent that helps guard against the growth of odors and prevent microbial attack on its coating.
Aerosols generally have high VOC emissions (objectionable odors).   Rubberized compounds also may have a high flammability or smoke generation, making it unsuitable for many uses.

While CRT’s Flex Seal is a flexible coating with qualities listed above, it would be the product of choice for coating insulation within HVAC units or ductwork to seal off the porous insulation, and making it possible to clean the insulation.  Its white color allows users to see immediately if there is any dirt or foreign material buildup on the coating surface, and thus clean it with a rag – something not before possible on porous materials such as insulation.

While the TV infomercial indicates that the aerosol material may be used to seal a condensate pan, this is highly undesirable for several reasons, including VOC emissions, and long term usage.  If one is to coat any surface, it is desirable to clean the surface first or coatings will not have their best adhesion.   In this case, we recommend Pancrete or T-84 to coat these types of surfaces.

Our customer service dept at custserv@cleanac.com or our application specialist at application.specialist@cleanac.com can assist you in helping you select the proper products for your application.

Lynn Burkhart is the founder and president of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc. located in Shelby, North Carolina. More information about the company, and its products, can be found at http://www.cleanac.com and by calling (800) 766-9057.