Tag: Ductile

Water in Ductwork, NOT TODAY!

Have you heard the following things listed OVER & OVER again in regards to your HVAC unit?

“No one wants any sort of strain on their HVAC unit. Strain that could cause many problems that are an extra cost to you. Such as:

-Higher energy bill
-Frequent maintenance on your HVAC unit
-HVAC replacement

There are many ways to keep your HVAC unit stress free. Below are just a few basic steps you can take to keep your HVAC system stress free. Very easy stuff, and they each only take a few moments of your time.

-Keep vents clear
-Keep those coils clean
-Change out the air filters regularly”

BUT, one thing that goes unmentioned quite often is the ductwork. Of course it would. Out of sight, out of mind, right?

Did you know, ductwork carries the warmth in the winter and holds the cool air in the summer. Without proper ductwork insulation, the temperature of the air being carried could be lost while transferring from the HVAC unit to the vents in your home. Ductwork can also play a major role in your energy bill. Even the Department of Energy claims so.

So, you see how important ductwork is. What if just a little bit of water entered your ductwork from the HVAC system? It’s just a little water. No biggie, right? Actually, YES! Even the smallest water droplet is a huge deal! To name a few, it can cause the following:

-Rust out metal ductwork
-Breeding ground for mold, mildew, and bacteria
-Decrease Indoor Air Quality greatly
-Water damage
-Degradation & De-lamination

Although, water in the ductwork can cause many problems. Your health alone should be enough reason to want to get your ductwork checked out. Exposure to mold can lead to allergies, infections, rashes, even alzheimer’s. The list just goes on and on.

When water gets in the insulation in your ductwork, those water droplets fly through your airstream. These water droplets create a breeding ground for mold & mildew. Water droplets will wreak havoc on the insulation in the ductwork causing degradation & de-lamination. Not only would this be tearing your insulation apart to later be replaced (more bucks from your pocket) but that delaminated insulation would be freely roaming the air in your home (remember you & your family are breathing this).

Why worry about water in your ductwork causing this step ladder of issues when there is a solution?

For the new home-owner, why not be preventative & go ahead and protect yourself?

Ductile is a coating that protects the HVAC ductwork from degradation and insulation de-lamination. Ductile locks down fiberglass particles that would enter the air stream. Hallelujah!
No stress of your insulation breaking down & no worries about your health. Did you hear that, NO STRESS!

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Contact us for more information on Ductile. Shandi or Candice will be more than happy to give you some information. 800-766-9057 or if you’re like me and prefer email reach out to sales@cleanac.com or custserv@cleanac.com

Technical Corner: When to Replace HVAC Insulation Pt. 2

During the life of the insulation, literally millions of cubic feet of air are passed through the AHU daily.  Air contains small particulate matter, the majority of which is below the limits of human visibility.  Air contains  ordinary dirt particles, and  microbial spores such as bacterial or fungal spores.  It is normal that these particulates impinge upon and get entrapped within the insulation.

When microbial spores impact the insulation, they often grow and amplify within the insulation itself.  This results in VOC emissions (odors) and a source of contamination for the rest of the air handler.

It is unfortunate that fiberglass cannot be cleaned or sanitized to help remove embedded microbes.  This is due to the nature of the fiberglass itself.

A workable solution to prevent fiberglass emissions and at the same time eliminate the potential for embedded microbes is to coat the surfaces of insulation.

Flex Seal ™ first brought on the market in the 1990s, was developed by our firm to address typical fiberglass insulation problems.

FIex Seal is applied using a professional  airless sprayer.   The coating of the insulation is done in place within the air handler, and takes a minimal amount of time.

A flexible white surface is obtained that is easily cleanable with a rag or brush.  This allows for the user to maintain the cleanliness of interior surfaces.

Flex Seal contains an antimicrobial to prevent  attack of microbes on its surface while controlling odors.   Drying time of the application is on the order of 3 to 5 hours depending upon temperatures and humidty.

Since most materials for duct construction are required to meet NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) 90A fire codes, Flex Seal has been engineered to surpass any and all fire/smoke requirements in the US or foreign countries.  ASTM tests show Flex Seal to have a Flame spread of zero, insuring full compliance with codes.

We recommend delaminated or heavily contaminated insulation be removed and replaced, and then recoated with Flex Seal.

Existing fiberglass insulation that still has its integrity and is not heavily contaminated should be coated to insure cleanabilty and prevention of fiberglass emissions.

What are your experiences, please let us know in the comment section below.

Lynn Burkhart is the founder and president of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc. located in Shelby, North Carolina. More information about the company, and its products, can be found at http://www.cleanac.com and by calling (800) 766-9057.

Technical Corner: When t­o Replace HVAC Insulation

Insulation is frequently applied to the internal enclosure of an HVAC air-handling unit (AHU) as well as air duct  interiors.   The majority of insulation found in use is of fiberglass construction.   The purpose of insulation is two-fold:  retaining heat or cold within the system and addressing acoustic concerns.

Of course, retaining heat or cold is of vital importance.   Loss of energy through the AHU enclosure or ductwork that is transporting the conditioned air means higher costs of operating the HVAC system.  Proper insulation helps keep these costs under control.  Indeed, if it were not for insulation, the size of HVAC units would have to be increased to take  energy losses into account.

Adequate interior insulation has also been shown to reduce the noise levels which otherwise might travel down the sheet metal ductwork and into occupied areas. Thus, the purpose of the insulation is two-fold – reducing energy losses and acoustic reduction.

While the insulation used in HVAC units is similar in character to that used to insulate houses, there is a vast difference in the operating conditions the insulation is exposed to.

Insulation placed on the interior of air handling units is subject to the normal vibrations when the system is turned on.  Glass fibers are bonded together using a polymeric glue mixture.  Over years of use, it is normal that fiberglass delaminates; probably this delimitation occurs due to vibrations, microbial attack on the glue, and temperature variations.  None the less, insulation that is over 20 years old may become delaminated.   A delaminated insulation loses its structural integrity and is likely to peel off in layers when handled.

Insulation efficiency of a delaminated fiberglass is not as great as properly formed material.

Older insulation, through loss of the bonding provided by the polymeric glue, can release fiberglass particles into the airstream, winding up in occupied room areas.  Often these particles are quite small, and can be breathed in by occupants.  Therefore, the presence of fiberglass particle emissions are looked upon as a negative.

Part two of this educational blog will be posting next week. Until then do not hesitate to list your comments or concerns below.

Lynn Burkhart is the founder and president of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc. located in Shelby, North Carolina. More information about the company, and its products, can be found at http://www.cleanac.com and by calling (800) 766-9057.

Product Spotlight: What Lies Beneath? Insulation Contamination

Unwanted deposits can gradually build up on, and even hide inside insulation. Once embedded, they are almost impossible to remove. Regular cleaning is useless, and vacuuming is not only ineffective, but advances the breakdown, or de-lamination of fiberglass insulation. This gradual process allows fiberglass particles to enter the air stream and occupied areas, where they may be inhaled.

At CRT, we have developed the following specifically formulated coatings to solve problems due to contamination, degradation and de-lamination. By using these products, air handler units, ductwork and mechanical room walls can remain safe, improving occupant comfort level, and assisting in future maintenance and cleaning of the HVAC system.

Flex Seal
Flex Seal is a NFPA 90A compliant, mildew-resistant coating that permanently protects surfaces from degradation. Flex Seal can be applied to HVAC ductwork, interior walls, insulation, wood, concrete-masonry and metal surfaces. Downtime is limited, due to low odor emissions and a fast drying time, and future cleanings are made easier because Flex Seal is scrubbable, and can quickly be wiped down.

Bioflex
Bioflex is an EPA registered, fungicidal coating that permanently protects surfaces from mold-related contamination. Bioflex can be applied to interior walls, insulation, wood, concrete-masonry and metal surfaces. Downtime is limited, due to low odor emissions and a fast drying time, and future cleanings are made easier because Bioflex is scrubbable, and can quickly be wiped down.

Ductile
Ductile is a low viscosity coating that permanently protects HVAC ductwork from degradation and insulation de-lamination. Ductile is specifically formulated for use in robotic air duct sprayers, making it easy to apply. Ductile is a complete encapsulate, locking down fiberglass particles that can enter the airstream, and making future cleaning easier as it can quickly be wiped down.

We welcome your comments, so please don’t hesitate to do so. We’d love to hear from you.

Jonathan Dunagin, Marketing Director of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc. located in Shelby, North Carolina. More information about the company, and its products, can be found at http://www.cleanac.com and by calling (800) 766-9057.