Tag: air

Water in Ductwork, NOT TODAY!

Have you heard the following things listed OVER & OVER again in regards to your HVAC unit?

“No one wants any sort of strain on their HVAC unit. Strain that could cause many problems that are an extra cost to you. Such as:

-Higher energy bill
-Frequent maintenance on your HVAC unit
-HVAC replacement

There are many ways to keep your HVAC unit stress free. Below are just a few basic steps you can take to keep your HVAC system stress free. Very easy stuff, and they each only take a few moments of your time.

-Keep vents clear
-Keep those coils clean
-Change out the air filters regularly”

BUT, one thing that goes unmentioned quite often is the ductwork. Of course it would. Out of sight, out of mind, right?

Did you know, ductwork carries the warmth in the winter and holds the cool air in the summer. Without proper ductwork insulation, the temperature of the air being carried could be lost while transferring from the HVAC unit to the vents in your home. Ductwork can also play a major role in your energy bill. Even the Department of Energy claims so.

So, you see how important ductwork is. What if just a little bit of water entered your ductwork from the HVAC system? It’s just a little water. No biggie, right? Actually, YES! Even the smallest water droplet is a huge deal! To name a few, it can cause the following:

-Rust out metal ductwork
-Breeding ground for mold, mildew, and bacteria
-Decrease Indoor Air Quality greatly
-Water damage
-Degradation & De-lamination

Although, water in the ductwork can cause many problems. Your health alone should be enough reason to want to get your ductwork checked out. Exposure to mold can lead to allergies, infections, rashes, even alzheimer’s. The list just goes on and on.

When water gets in the insulation in your ductwork, those water droplets fly through your airstream. These water droplets create a breeding ground for mold & mildew. Water droplets will wreak havoc on the insulation in the ductwork causing degradation & de-lamination. Not only would this be tearing your insulation apart to later be replaced (more bucks from your pocket) but that delaminated insulation would be freely roaming the air in your home (remember you & your family are breathing this).

Why worry about water in your ductwork causing this step ladder of issues when there is a solution?

For the new home-owner, why not be preventative & go ahead and protect yourself?

Ductile is a coating that protects the HVAC ductwork from degradation and insulation de-lamination. Ductile locks down fiberglass particles that would enter the air stream. Hallelujah!
No stress of your insulation breaking down & no worries about your health. Did you hear that, NO STRESS!

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Contact us for more information on Ductile. Shandi or Candice will be more than happy to give you some information. 800-766-9057 or if you’re like me and prefer email reach out to sales@cleanac.com or custserv@cleanac.com

HVAC Industry News “ASHRAE & IAQA To Join Forces”

July of this year something very important happened in the HVAC world!

ASHRAE, IAQA To Join Forces To Grow Resources For Indoor Air Quality Professionals

The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) have agreed in principle to join forces, combining resources to improve indoor air quality in the built environment.

Pending a three to six month period of due diligence, IAQA will become a part of the ASHRAE organization while maintaining its own brand and Board of Directors. IAQA will operate independently within ASHRAE’s organizational structure. Plans call for IAQA headquarters to relocate from Rockville, Md., to Atlanta, Ga., home of ASHRAE’s international headquarters. The agreement was reached between the leadership of both associations and confirmed at ASHRAE’s 2014 Annual Conference that concluded earlier this month in Seattle, Wash.

“This merger is beneficial to both ASHRAE and IAQA in that it strengthens the programs and services of both organizations,” Tom Phoenix, ASHRAE president, said. “The work of IAQA complements the work of ASHRAE in its standards, research, publications and educational offerings. We now combine our resources to ensure the industry receives the best indoor air quality technical guidance and educational programs possible, which means improved indoor air quality for the world around us.”

Among ASHRAE’s major indoor air quality offerings are Standard 62.1, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, and Standard 62.2, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings, and publications such as the Indoor Air Quality Guide: Best Practices for Design, Construction and Commissioning. ASHRAE also recently announced the formation of the Indoor Environmental Quality Global Alliance, which included IAQA as a charter member. ASHRAE also has a strong research program related to indoor air quality with 10 current projects totaling $2.8 million, representing 23 percent of ASHRAE’s research budget.

“This merger allows IAQA to maintain its own brand while also providing its members with enhanced benefits and services,” Kent Rawhouser, president of IAQA, said. “Our strong history of programs and products is expected to not only continue, but to grow as the merger allows us to take advantage of the resources and programs overseen by ASHRAE. Members of IAQA and ASHRAE will work collaboratively to strengthen indoor air quality programs for the industry, and most importantly, for the people who occupy homes and buildings around the world.”

IAQA provides continuing education, conferences and expositions, certification programs, monthly webinars, technical publications and funds indoor air quality related research. IAQA subsidiary, Indoor Environmental Standards Organization (IESO), is an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) accredited standards developing organization focused on indoor air quality assessment, remediation and management of indoor environments.

ASHRAE and IAQA programs will be aligned to create high-impact resources for building professionals around the globe.

“Indoor air quality is vitally important to the health and welfare of people worldwide,” Phoenix said. “Air quality systems must work harmoniously with other systems in homes and buildings to ensure a healthy and sustainable built environment.”

The Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing practitioners together to prevent and solve indoor environmental problems for the benefit of customers and the public. IAQA was established in 1995 and is the nation’s largest indoor air quality trade association with over 2,600 members and more than 20 local chapters across the United States and Canada. More information is available at www.iaqa.org/news and at www.ieso.org.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

Reference Article Here:
https://www.ashrae.org/news/2014/ashrae-iaqa-to-join-forces-to-grow-resources-for-indoor-air-quality-professionals

Controlled Release Technologies Inc. is a research, development and manufacturing firm based in Shelby, North Carolina. CRT is an IFMA CSP, EnergyStar Partner and manufacturer of independently-certified Green products for HVAC maintenance. Since 1986, CRT has been creating leading edge HVAC maintenance products that have become industry standards, used in thousands of commercial buildings world-wide. CRT employees are members of BOMA, ASHRAE, ASHE and the American Chemical Society. http://www.cleanac.com (800) 766-9057.

Technically Speaking: Is HVAC Sanitization Important?

Most occupants of a commercial building or patients in a hospital have never seen the inside of an HVAC air handler.

Cleanliness of these areas is very important though. When in a modern building, all of the air you are breathing in passes through the air handler. Naturally, you would want it to be clean.

Unfortunately, this is not the fact most of the time. From my own experience in looking at interiors of air handlers where your air goes through, I would have to say that a good 50% of air handlers have mold and deposits on their cooling surfaces and condensate collection pans.

mold deposits
I have witnessed several hospitals with the skeletons of dead animals (birds, lizards, etc). In hospitals with recirculated air, it is possible that some germs may alight on, and grow on, cooling coils. In one major hospital, a swab was taken from the coils and some strange, uncommon microbes were found on the coils.

Other than wanting to breathe in clean air that has not passed through and around mold and other germs, keeping the interior clean of biological matter is important just from an energy standpoint.

Layers of microbes, called biofilms, act as an insulator on cooling coils, and retard heat transfer. There is evidence, published in the ASHRAE journal, that a reduction of up to 40% occurs because of dirty coils alone.

So, yes, keeping the interiors of HVAC air handlers clean is quite helpful, not only for the occupants, but also financially.

fast attack
Controlled release has developed and registered with the US EPA “Fast Attack HVAC System Sanitizer”. This is an iodine-based product that has several advantages for users.

You can find out more on Fast Attack HVAC System Sanitizer by going to our company website at http://www.cleanac.com/fast-attack

lynn
Lynn Burkhart is the founder and president of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc. located in Shelby, North Carolina. More information about the company, and its products, can be found at http://www.cleanac.com and by calling (800) 766-9057.