Feature: HVAC Hess – Fact Sheet on the Importance of Cleaning Coils

Keep in mind that the air you breathe is directly from your coils. I have heard several horror stories about locations of AHU’s that were very neglected. One place – a hospital – so neglected that their were dead animals in the drain pans. The place that should be cleaner than any other place had people breathing the unimaginable. So I pose the question, what are you really breathing?

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My inspiration of this blog came from HVAC HESS (The Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning High Efficiency Systems Strategy) a ten year strategy under the Nation Strategy on Energy Efficiency (NSEE) that aims to drive long term improvements in energy efficiency of HVAC Systems Australia wide. Their goal is to educate, inform, and encourage energy efficiency in the HVAC Industry. A series of the HESS fact sheets can be found at http://www.ee.ret.gov.au/energy-efficiency/non-residential-buildings/heating-ventilation-and-air-conditioning-hvac/hvac-hess-fact-sheets

I wrote a blog a few weeks ago about the price of our Powder Keg being so low. What I didn’t think to mention is why it is so important to clean coils. My ex-husband and several other contractors that I know just rinse their coils off with water. I am here to tell you the reasons why actually cleaning your coil with a cleaner is important in more ways than one! All of what I wanted to say, I found in an awesome article that describes it ALL!

dirty fins

“ Finned coils are used in a number of different applications in HVAC systems to transfer heat either into or out of air streams.

There are two basic types of coils:

1. Condenser coils – Condenser coils transfer heat into a space. Refrigerant vapor is forced into the coil under pressure, condensing the refrigerant into a liquid, which results in the rejection of heat across the heat exchange surface.
2. Evaporator coils – Evaporator coils do the opposite to condenser coils. Liquid refrigerant is pumped into a low pressure coil, causing the refrigerant to evaporate into a vapor, absorbing heat across the heat exchange surface in the process.
coil outdoor

Over time the surfaces of these coils can become dirty as the air moving over the coils can contain dust, dirt, pollen, moisture and other contaminants. A build-up of contaminants decreases the available surface area for heat transfer, reducing the energy consumption and poor system performance. It is important that air conditioning coils are regularly inspected and indoor air quality; a fact that has led to regular coil cleaning becoming a regulatory requirement in certain circumstances and provides guidance on cleaning.”

Here are all the very important points this article by HVAC HESS hits on regarding why Cleaning Coils is important:

-Energy Efficiency
-System Performance
-Equipment Life Cycle
-Indoor Air Quality
-When and How to Clean

To see this fact sheet please follow the link: http://www.ee.ret.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/09_2013/hvac-fs-cleaning-coils.pdf


Keep in mind that the air you breathe is directly from your coils. I have heard several horror stories about locations of AHU’s that were very neglected. One place – a hospital – so neglected that their were dead animals in the drain pans. The place that should be cleaner than any other place had people breathing the unimaginable. So I pose the question, what are you really breathing?



kdKristen Bean, Assistant Marketing Director of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc., a research, development and manufacturing firm based in Shelby, North Carolina.  CRT is an IFMA CSP, an EnergyStar Partner and manufacturer of independently-certified Green products for HVAC maintenance. Since 1986, CRT has been creating leading edge HVAC maintenance products that have become industry standards, used in thousands of commercial buildings world-wide. CRT employees are members of BOMA, ASHRAE, ASHE and the American Chemical Society. www.cleanac.com

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