Tips From “The Girls”: Event + Response = Outcome

Join me in turning your negative events into positive outcomes by taking control of your response.

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During adversity, confrontation, stress and overwhelming situations, one must remember to ask, “Am I going to let this event trigger the worst response in me?” You are your own result to the outcome.

This is one of the many points Shandi & I were exposed to when we attended a seminar taught by Judy Barbour. The seminar’s purpose is to improve women’s communication skills in the work place, but personally I know a few men that should’ve been attending as well.

The class stressed that women can let emotions get the better of them, and when men see women getting emotional, they RUN AWAY. Neither Man nor Woman wants to deal with emotions. So it is important to try and control and contain emotions.

Looking at this, I realized I let negative events bring out a negative, emotional response from me. My own negative response usually equaled a horrible outcome. I let my emotions and stress make a situation much worse. Not only do I make it worse, but then I reminisce on what I could’ve done differently.

How many of us get into an argument or are nervous and just can’t say the right things? Later on, to ourselves we think, “I should’ve said this or I should’ve done that instead.” Don’t think you’re the only one that does that; we all do.

Here is an example of an event, that normally I would’ve reacted with emotion, but instead met with a positive response and a reasonable outcome.

Last Friday, I returned from a very relaxing lunch break to a chaotic wreck. I had made a mistake and shipped out a package one day late. Yes, I just said I made a mistake. The client needed the product for a job on Saturday, and now they wouldn’t see their package until Monday.

What was I to do? I value my clients’ happiness and now all I could think of was how upset my client was going to be. I could’ve let my emotions get the better of me. I could’ve doubted myself, worried about the situation and made things worse. Instead, I took action.

I speedily tried to correct my mistake with calls to Fed Ex. When that wasn’t possible, I contacted the client with the bad news. She was very disappointed, and needed to relay the news to her people. As I finished my call, I was determined to fix this, and stated “I will continue to do everything I can.”

Without delay, I began calling distributors in her area, I talked to Fed Ex again about overnight Saturday deliveries, and I even tracked how long it would take to deliver the package myself. I did everything I could possibly do, but still couldn’t find a reasonable option to fix my mistake.

Finally, I called my client back with the news. As I was telling her all the options I had considered, she kindly replied, “Thanks so much for all you have done to fix this. I talked to the service guys and it was going to be 105 degrees outside and they rescheduled for next Saturday. I have never seen anyone work this hard to make something wrong, right. I really appreciate your integrity and sincerity.”

I had tried absolutely everything that I could to fix my issue. I didn’t let myself get overwhelmed, I didn’t give up, and I didn’t stress out. I calmly tried to handle my horrible event with a rational and positive response. In return, I received (to me) a perfect outcome. I turned a bad situation into a positive outcome because of my own response. Yes, I had control over my response and so do you.

As a side note, the client’s response to my negative news showed her professionalism. She didn’t let her emotions get the best of her either. Join me in turning your negative events into positive outcomes by taking control of your response. Let me know ways you have succeeded using steps to keep emotions under control.

Kristen Davis, Client Services Rep., and Shandi Maddox, Marketing Assistant of Controlled Release Technologies, Inc., a research, development and manufacturing firm based in Shelby, North Carolina. CRT is an IFMA CSP, an EnergyStar Partner and manufacturer of independently-certified Green products for HVAC maintenance. Since 1986, CRT has been creating leading edge HVAC maintenance products that have become industry standards, used in thousands of commercial buildings world-wide. CRT employees are members of BOMA, ASHRAE, ASHE and the American Chemical Society. www.cleanac.com

Controlled Release Technologies, Inc., a research, development and manufacturing firm based in Shelby, North Carolina. CRT is an IFMA CSP, EnergyStar Partner and manufacturer of independently-certified Green products for HVAC maintenance. Since 1986, CRT has been creating leading edge HVAC maintenance products that have become industry standards, used in thousands of commercial buildings world-wide. CRT employees are members of BOMA, ASHRAE, ASHE and the American Chemical Society. www.cleanac.com (800) 766-9057.


1 comments on “Tips From “The Girls”: Event + Response = Outcome”

  1. Whoa. I’m glad both of you were able to attend this. We all need help in this area, from time to time. Heavens knows I needed help when I was taking those steroids!! I moved over 3000 lbs of rock and ticked off many people. Could I have controlled myself? I don’t know, thats why I took it out on the rocks! 🙂

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